Netflix Drama “I Care a Lot” highlights financial abuse of elderly by state-funded caregivers.

A drama about a managed care facility for the elderly, whereby senior management scan the health files of local hospitals, to determine who to target for the acquisition of the elderly persons assets.

Bewarecare interview: Wairapapa Times Age.

Image

Story reads:

An Auckland family counsellor is calling for more protection for the elderly from the risk of financial abuse by professional caregivers.

Stephen Taylor, family counsellor and director of Relationship Matters Ltd, believes stronger measures are needed to protect vulnerable elderly from being exploited by state-funded and private in-home caregivers.

“One case I became familiar with was a woman who worked as an in-home caregiver, and who had groomed and then financially exploited so many elderly clients, she ended up with a portfolio of 10 properties to her name.”

Mr Taylor believes the elderly, who have often built up significant assets during their lives, are vulnerable to being emotionally manipulated by caregivers because of the nature of the role.

Often, he says, families are powerless to intervene in the situation.

Mr Taylor is inviting anyone who has had this experience to contact him, as he plans to present a petition to the government calling for the creation of stronger measures to protect the elderly.

Some of the obvious areas that need addressing, Mr Taylor says, are:

* Lawyers of clients should be excluded from being beneficiaries of their client’s Will.

* Financial abuse of the elderly should be a “criminal” matter instead of a “civil” matter.

* Criminal sanctions must be available to families and agencies to prosecute caregivers who place their clients in a position of dependency on them.

* No service provider, public or state-funded, that is supplying any service to a client should be involved in the personal and financial affairs of their clients.

* There should be a professional association for private and state funded caregivers (in home or otherwise), a Code of Ethical Conduct, and meaningful training in ethics.

* Money and gifts from clients to their service delivery provider should be off limits.

* The Health & Disability Commissioner needs more firepower, funding, people and resources to speed up decisions on complaints which currently can take more than a year.

* Anyone who is professional caregiver should have an EPOA if they are a recipient of any personal financial benefits from an elderly person, and if they do have an EPOA and/or have been named as a beneficiary of a client’s Will, then they should have to be able to prove beyond reasonable doubt that they attained the role of a beneficiary legitimately.

Mr Taylor may be contacted at steve.taylor@relationshipmatters.org.nz

Please go to https://bewarecare.org/ for more information on this issue, and to share your story of elder financial abuse.

Caregivers who collude together, commit elderly financial abuse together.

Image result for secrets

A daughter regularly goes to visit her elderly mother in a high-profile NZ-based Retirement Home Provider.

A state-funded Caregiver is appointed by the Retirement Home Provider to provide in-home caregiving services to the elderly mother.

Over time, the daughter notices that the caregiver appears to be spending a lot of time with the daughters mother, and that the daughters mother talks about “how wonderful” the caregiver is.

One day, the daughter arrives at the mothers unit, and sees two caregivers working on site.

“This is one of my team, and I’m just training them up” is the explanation given by the original caregiver.

On a subsequent visit, the daughter visits her mother, and finds the “junior” caregiver sitting in the lounge of the unit, but the caregiver is not doing any work.

“Where’s Mum?” enquired the daughter.

“In with my Team Leader, but you can’t go in there, they are having a private conversation”.

Yes, the Team leader was indeed “having a private conversation” with the daughters elderly mother- the conversation was about the mother giving money to the two caregivers. One would have the conversation, and one would stay in the lounge to make sure no-one else could come in and interrupt the conversation.

10 points for anyone who can guess what the daughter (as EPOA) found out when she checked her elderly mothers bank statements, and cross-checked the sharp rise in account debits leaving her mothers account (money going into two separate third-party accounts), since the caregiver began providing state-funded service delivery?

Age Concern more concerned with its reputation, not the financial abuse of the elderly?

So, I wrote this:

https://www.bhb.nz/straight-talk/open-season-on-the-elderly

And Age Concerns Response was this (see page 8):

Discuss.

Financial elder grooming and abuse set to increase if Euthanasia Bill passed, says NZ Aged Care Founder.

New agency to fight Covid-19? - NZ Herald
Brien Cree, Executive Chairman and founder of Radius Care.

Key quote in the article:

“I have seen elder abuse up close,” he says, “and I know there are people out there who would move heaven and earth to end the life of a person if it meant they could get their hands on the money. I have seen and heard of some terrible experiences”.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sponsored-stories/assisted-dying-could-increase-elder-abuse/MGPZLHLZFS22GRNPLU7HXNGFKU/